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Welcome!

Welcome to my blog:) Since I am so far away from my friends and family, I want to keep you updated on the fun and trials of my new job. Thank you to everyone for your support, encouragement, and the tips/ideas you may offer!

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Understanding Poverty #2

Before I jump into my book reflection....despite reading work related books, I'm still on summer vacation.  The TV is definitely on (not always just in the background) while I read and blog.  Today I discovered I really enjoy "Melissa and Joey"!  It reminds me of some of my favorite shows from growing up:  Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Brotherly Love, plus the show is pretty humorous!

Also, head over to Dirty Hands and Lesson Plans.  Katie has a super cute blog and is having an awesome giveaway because she reached 250 followers!  Congrats Katie:)

A Framework for Understanding Poverty by Ruby K. Payne, Ph.D


Chapter 2 - Reflection

People in different socioeconomic statuses speak in different ways.  This effects the way students write, the way parents communicate with parents, and how difficult it is for people living in poverty to get a job, because they speak in a different way than people in the middle class or those of wealth. Payne explains how this works in chapter 2 and gives examples of the different ways people in poverty talk vs. people in middle class.

What this means to teachers...
- We need to be more sensitive to the parents trying to communicate with us.  
- We need to directly teach students how to talk and write in a more formal form of English.
- We need to accept the way they already talk and write as one form of communication.

This year I had two specific students who would write the way they talk.  They would leave out words, write "swimmin" instead of "swimming", writing one long sentence (that should have been 5), etc.  I tried very hard to work on editing with these students, and after several weeks they began picking up on some common editing mistakes on their own.  However, I never acknowledged the way they were writing as "a real form of communication".  I wish I had spent more time expressing that that is one way of writing and speaking, but at school and when working people try to use a more formal way of speaking and writing.  Note to self....

Now it's your turn!  

How do you work to improve students grammar in their writing or conversations without belittling the way they talk?

How do you incorporate students' informal/home version of language at school?

Any other thoughts about how verbal communication affects our students and our relationships with their parents?

3 comments:

Ashley Kathleen said...

I just wanted to comment & say that I am happy to be a new follower of your blog! I *love* finding special education teacher blogs (I currently teach a resource room class for grades 1-5).

That book seems really interesting and informative. I may have to check it out!

Ashley
Miss Ashley's Amazing Resource Room

Nicole Allison said...

Hello,
I totally agree with this. Being a speech therapist, I am challenged to make students aware that certain communication is okay in certain situations-Heck-I even say "ain't" when I am singing along with a country song! However, I believe a very real part of making our students successful includes teaching them how to speak to everyone-that includes teachers, bosses, friends, family. Thanks for sharing!

Anonymous said...

Love your blog on this book. I am a school counselor. I just took a class this summer on students in poverty and this book was one of the books we had to read. I have to agree with you about the language that students use when writing papers and even filling our their college applications. I work in a rural community and students write all the time using improper English. I read a students college essay for them and was shocked to see for the word and they used an and just had so may grammar mistakes. I also believe that texting has also played a part in how our kids talk now a days and that affects the grammar they use.
As Payne pointed, out and you stated,"People in different socioeconomic statuses speak in different ways. This effects the way students write, the way parents communicate with parents, and how difficult it is for people living in poverty to get a job, because they speak in a different way than people in the middle class or those of wealth. Payne explains how this works in chapter 2 and gives examples of the different ways people in poverty talk vs. people in middle class." I totally agree with you on this one!